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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
's foreign policy position. he sailed he wouldn't pick him as secretary of state because they have a very different philosophy, bill. bill: we'll see if she mentions some of the more fiery hot spots on the globe today, she's been traveling a million miles, isn't that what she said yesterday. >> reporter: we heard a lot about her traveling more than a million miles as secretary of state. those of who who like hillary clinton were applauding her for her service and her going all over the world and others wanted to ask tough questions about benghazi. martha: i see elizabeth war warren at the table there. is she playing a roam? we are seeing new faces in the senate. >> reporter: i think she has an introduction here. do you want to listen in. martha: sure. >> i know will continue in the tradition of john quincy adams and christian herder as great secretaries from the commonwealth of massachusetts. although john learned more about diplomacy overseas and in the senate he'll be the first to tell you that massachusetts is a great teacher of diplomatic skills. whether it was negotiating his way to
attack. joining us now, danielle pletka, vice president foreign policy and defense studies, defense policy studies, i should say, at the american enterprise institute. danielle, thanks for being with us. you wrote a column this week in which your first words were it's hard to like john kerry? [laughter] >> well, i worked for ten years up at the senate foreign relations committee when senator kerry wasn't the chairman, he was one of the other members of the committee. he's just not that popular on capitol hill. he hasn't worked well with other members. that was one of the problems he had when he ran for president. he's perceived as being stand offish, as being uninterested in their issues and in being kind of doctrinaire on policy. jon: but bob corker, the new mexico senator -- we're going to be talking to him next hour -- had glowing words for senator kerry in the hearing this morning. >> every senator walks into a hearing with another senator who's been nominated for something thinking there but for the grace of god go i. it's a collegial institution, but the collegiality is about
of experiences. both in foreign policy and on the crime bill, the '94 crime bill is something he shepherded and his extraordinary ability to deal with senate republicans in a way a lot of people can't. senator reed and mitch mcconnell don't get along that well so i don't read nieg into it other than the president has an eset in the vice president and he's using that asset and he's deploying him well. the thing we should be mindful of is that there's over the next four years there's going to be a lot of tea leaf reading but at the end of the day, you know, the president is using the personing that get a job done and he's done an extraordinary job so far. let me say, passing this legislation will be tough. it's important to put your best feet on the ground there because it's really not -- it's going to be tough to get these bills passed. >> and it's not just ability. the vice president -- and again i worked closely with him for a few years -- he really likes this kind of political dealmaking in a way i don't think the president likes that much. if he's pushed to it he can do it. but the vice
.s. foreign policy? we get some answers. >> brown: then, two military stories. we get the latest on defense secretary leon panetta's decision to lift the ban on women serving in combat. >> ifill: and we explore the pros and cons of drone warfare and examine the technology behind it-- the subject of tonight's edition of "nova." >> our mind tries to put it in rms of robot or human? but the reality is a mix. >> brown: we close with politics and a look at the way forward for the republican party, beginning with today's house vote to extend the nation's debt limit for three months. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: secretary of state hillary clinton testified for the first time today about last september's deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. her testimony befor
administration's foreign policy and i urge his sped deacon firm mags. >> before leaving, just like her first day on the job four years ago -- >> i am absolutely honored and thrilled beyond words to be here with you. >> clinton is likely to say good-bye to the diplomat she's led and deliver a major speech on international policy. but her last days as america's high-flying top diplomat have been overshadowed by nearly a month of illness, the fallout over the deadly attack in benghazi. >> i think it's inexcusable that you did not know about this and that you did not read these cables. >> and her impassioned defense. >> what difference at this point does it make? it is our job to figure out what happened. >> i don't think it will be part of her legacy. >> beyond benghazi, former secretary of state madeleine albright says clinton did something big for america's foreign policy. >> i think she will be valued greatly for finding other parts than just military power for america the way that we use our influence. >> others, while praising clinton personally, charge the administration she's part of, failed
in africa, and the challenges for u.s foreign policy. the attack on the u.s. consulate we're joined by former u.s. diplomat nicholas burns who served in republican and democratic administrations, he's now with the kennedy school of government and harvard university. and danielle pletka, vice president for foreign and defense studies at the american enterprise institute. with you and start with benghazi. was there more light shed today. where do things stand in terms of understanding what happened and the response to it? >> well, jeffrey, i thought it was a commanding performance by secretary clinton. she was well informed. she was a master of the detail, and all the-- and she took responsibility, which was the right thing to do. she said that she will implement all the 29 recommendations of the accountability review board. now, i think the republicans there obviously had a right-- and i think they had an obligation to ask tough questions because this was a disaster for the american foreign service to lose four people in one day, including ambassador chris stevens. but i must say jus
controlling sometimes in how they methods foreign policy, but secretary clinton never stepped on anybody's toes. she always left it to the president to take the lead on things. so i think that was a sign that she was a team player. i find, charlie, more people from both parties today saying that they thought she did a good job, and that she showed that she has real depth. then you would have found four years ago. >> rose: clearly it enhanced her reputation. >> i think so. >> rose: when you look forward to the service of john kerry, assuming what most people believe the obvious confirmation because he's of the senate himself, will he be a different secretary of state? >> would expect, charlie, that you'll see a little bit more of the back-channel negotiating style that we associate with a kissinger or jim bake frer senator kerry. he thinks that we need a period of quiet can diplomacy to explore options, to see if there's some way to negotiate some kind of deal over the nuclear issue with iran, to explore some way with russia to get a negotiated political transition in syria. and i think h
far. >> i have a foreign policy question but first i wanted to ask, for the administration's response, the house has now passed the three-month suspension of the u.s. debt ceiling. what's your comments? >> it's the same as it was yesterday. the president believes that we need to, as a country, do the responsible thing and without drama or delay pay our bills. meet our commitments. ideally we would extend a raise -- or raise the debt ceiling for a long period of time so that this is not a question, so that the uncertainty that has surrounded this issue of late because of the political strategy that house republicans have taken will be removed or would be removed. it is certainly important to recognize that the bill that passed the house today, the position that the house republicans took beginning late last week represents a fundamental change from a strategy that they pursued up until this point which is to try to link the debt ceiling to an ideological agenda of spending cuts in which the choice presented to the american people was, either face dramatic cuts in social security or med
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)